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Why Cs Cart Lacks Of Good Looking (Modern) Themes Rate Topic   - - - - -

 

Posted 13 July 2018 - 12:56 PM #41

Several of my established cs-cart clients are moving on to other shopping carts. I guess it’s time to start learning a new one. Cs-cart was a good solution over the last 10 years. I am not sure I can say that anymore.

Moving away because of the "look and feel" only, or other reasons?



 
  • jain1980
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Posted 13 July 2018 - 05:31 PM #42

Less than 1% market share for cs-cart in Ecommerce market.

 

Which could have been a lot higher if they had a team which was proactive and looked in the future and stayed ahead of the curve...what they are doing now is following a path laid by other platforms...what a waste of a great platform...



 
  • jain1980
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Posted 13 July 2018 - 05:32 PM #43

lol...by the time cs-cart will do this, the world would have moved on to Bootstrap 6 or something higher....

 

Well, they are planning everything for CS-Cart 5 (Post CSS, Bootstrap 5, etc.) and not updating the current release candidate. Which is both a good and bad thing.



 
  • jain1980
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Posted 13 July 2018 - 05:34 PM #44

Can you let us know what shopping carts as even we would like to move on to something as lightweight as cs-cart but also has a lot of developers available easily....

 

Several of my established cs-cart clients are moving on to other shopping carts. I guess it’s time to start learning a new one. Cs-cart was a good solution over the last 10 years. I am not sure I can say that anymore.



 
  • DRodrigues
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Posted 16 July 2018 - 08:32 PM #45

The smaller the pool of users, the less time will be spent developing add ons, themes, etc for the platform. Look at WordPress - millions of users equates to millions of plugins, themes, etc available for it. Unless CS Cart gets to a mass adoption rate, it is likely it won't ever get to the point where you are hoping it would be. 



 
  • jain1980
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Posted 24 July 2018 - 03:10 PM #46

With the kind of ethics they have, they never would be the a top selling cart. 

 

I love cs-cart for its light weight and minimal usage of resources but lack of local developers available. Today I posted a question in the General Forums asking for an alternative to cs-cart which has local developer support and I listed some alternatives which has local developers available and requested for some suggestions. The thread was deleted in a few hours..Now I am taking a screenshot and if they do it again, I will have the screenshot of what I am posting it here...



 
  • tbirnseth
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Posted 24 July 2018 - 07:06 PM #47

In fairness, this is a cs-cart user community forum.

Removing posts that inspire people to move away from cs-cart is not really in the community's interest.

They've generally been okay at leaving posts that are critical of the product and/or business practices.  But direct references to competitors (when not used as an example feature enhancement) have always been moderated.

 

I think you will find the same practices at other "user/community forums" for other businesses.


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  • daimion
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Posted 08 August 2018 - 12:23 PM #48

I agree that the CS-Cart has a certain feel of being dated, when comparing to some of the others which somehow has a slicker feel.
But I honestly think it comes down to what you need out of your site. If yours is a simple store, minimal payment options, and easy shipping calculators, then you have the benefit of being able to choose based on design.

 

For a more complicated store, I have still stuck with CS-Cart. I look at competitors yearly (around the time my licence is about to expire), but still can't find any that includes the same options.

So one thing I'd definitely advice when trying out different sites, is to imagine what your final site should be, taking into account your company expansions, etc. 

As for the design, I honestly thing at the end of the day, a good design might get customers to browse, but it still comes down to your products, service pricing.



 
  • tbirnseth
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Posted 08 August 2018 - 07:10 PM #49

Just 2 cent comment, and I've stated this for 10 years here....

 

Don't fool yourself into thinking your site is either your main marketing tool or your sales tool.  You should have people ready to purchase from other marketing methods by the time they reach your site.  It is a closing tool (get their commitment fast and easy).

 

The role of your site is to make the buying experience as pain-free as possible and to up sell other products/accessories/services for sale.  I.e. tell them (or show them) what they're buying and why they should buy it from you. Then make that process as easy as possible.

 

The vast majority of cs-cart merchants are never going to compete with Amazon so you better figure out what makes you different to your customers if you sell the same products.  The customer should be ready to buy when they hit your site.  You are never going to become the premier online shopping experience, so focus on getting the customer fulfilled in as few clicks as possible without overwhelming them with information.

 

Look at your own buying habits.  How do you find what you're looking for?  What makes you buy from example.com versus otherexample.com?  Do you know anything about who you're buying from?  Or are you judging the book by its cover?  Once customers are at your site, can you incent them in any way to buy more products/services than they intended? (promotions, discounts, free-shipping, BOGO, etc.).  Can you offer them any incentive during checkout summary to return to your site and buy from you again?

 

Marketing priorities are generally (product/service dependent):

1) Word of mouth

2) Organic search

3) Email marketing

4) Shopping aggregators

 

Customers are most sensitive to (decreasing priority)

1) total cost including shipping

2) product cost

3) shipping cost

4) Any response from any customer service request

5) Assumptions about customer service including return policies, etc.

6) Ease of navigation on the site

7) Ease of checkout (clarity, double-entry, automation, payment methods)

8) Impression of site security

 

Other than that, it's all easy! :-)


EZ Merchant Solutions: Custom (USA based) B2B Development, Consulting, Development and Special Projects (get a quote here).
Commercial addons, payment methods and modifications to meet your business and operations needs.


 
  • jain1980
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Posted 12 August 2018 - 08:38 AM #50

Just 2 cent comment, and I've stated this for 10 years here....

 

Don't fool yourself into thinking your site is either your main marketing tool or your sales tool.  You should have people ready to purchase from other marketing methods by the time they reach your site.  It is a closing tool (get their commitment fast and easy).

 

The role of your site is to make the buying experience as pain-free as possible and to up sell other products/accessories/services for sale.  I.e. tell them (or show them) what they're buying and why they should buy it from you. Then make that process as easy as possible.

 

The vast majority of cs-cart merchants are never going to compete with Amazon so you better figure out what makes you different to your customers if you sell the same products.  The customer should be ready to buy when they hit your site.  You are never going to become the premier online shopping experience, so focus on getting the customer fulfilled in as few clicks as possible without overwhelming them with information.

 

Look at your own buying habits.  How do you find what you're looking for?  What makes you buy from example.com versus otherexample.com?  Do you know anything about who you're buying from?  Or are you judging the book by its cover?  Once customers are at your site, can you incent them in any way to buy more products/services than they intended? (promotions, discounts, free-shipping, BOGO, etc.).  Can you offer them any incentive during checkout summary to return to your site and buy from you again?

 

Marketing priorities are generally (product/service dependent):

1) Word of mouth

2) Organic search

3) Email marketing

4) Shopping aggregators

 

Customers are most sensitive to (decreasing priority)

1) total cost including shipping

2) product cost

3) shipping cost

4) Any response from any customer service request

5) Assumptions about customer service including return policies, etc.

6) Ease of navigation on the site

7) Ease of checkout (clarity, double-entry, automation, payment methods)

8) Impression of site security

 

Other than that, it's all easy! :-)

 

You nailed it....Summed up so well with absolutely no BS...Your contribution to this community is invaluable...