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File Permission Rate Topic   - - - - -

 
  • taydu
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Posted 05 March 2007 - 12:02 AM #1

according to the text file in:

2. Go to the CS-Cart installation directory and change file access permissions.
On Unix-based server with terminal access to it you can do it using the
following commands:

> chmod 777 admin.php
> chmod 777 config.php
> chmod 777 index.php
> chmod 777 image.php
> chmod -R 777 var
> chmod -R 777 images
> chmod -R 777 skins

After the installation shouldn't it I change admin.php, config.php, index.php, image.php to 644 and var, images, skins to 755?

 
  • bholland
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Posted 06 March 2007 - 09:26 PM #2

I'm curious about this as well...

 
  • S-Combs
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Posted 07 March 2007 - 11:00 AM #3

Yes, all the files listed can be reverted to 644 but not the directories (other than the store root directory)

var and skins directories must retain 777 but, if using the database for your images then the images directory can be reverted to 755.

 
  • argentice
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Posted 19 May 2007 - 08:00 AM #4

This is very useful, thanks.

But, what shoud be the permission of all the other directories? e.g. core
Rob

 
  • zardos
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Posted 19 May 2007 - 12:10 PM #5

Hi argentice

They should be 755

 

Posted 23 May 2007 - 03:34 PM #6

Not sure about this, but on my server I just discovered that if you want to use auto-thumbnail generation the images (and subs) must be 777. Took me days of chasing my tail on this one.
j

 
  • MikeK
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Posted 23 May 2007 - 03:56 PM #7

It would be nice if we could get some clarification from CS-C on this subject. It's too easy to have a glaring security problem with files being writable when they shouldn't be.