Paying Employee for Phone Orders

We have an employee who besides her other duties, answers the phone for our website customers. She’s paid hourly, but If she converts a customer call into an order, we pay her a 2% commission on the product price. That works well as she puts in a comment in the notes section that she in fact entered the order.



The issue I am having is that she claims she gets a lot of calls where she believes she has convinced the customer to buy, but the customer decides to put the order in via the website so they don’t have to give personal and CC info over the phone. I get why a customer would want to do that, but the question is how do I accurately know which orders to pay her for? I trust she’ll tell me the truth, but the way it is now, she could claim any number of orders, and unless I call the customer to confirm, I am none the wiser.



I have some ideas how to deal with this, but was looking to see if anyone else has dealt with this problem and how they solved it. Maybe I am just doing the whole process wrong and there’s a better way to do phone orders.



Appreciate any and all advice.



Chris

You should immediately start recording all of her phone conversations…

I would simply compare what I thought was realistic phone to sales conversions (assign to sit ratio) with a comparable hourly pay rate.



“OR”



Give her an assigned three digit code or something similar that she will give the customer to put in before checking out. This way you know that she had something to do with the sale. I’m fairly certain that you can accomplish this with CS’s promotions.



By the way…it’s not a good idea to record an employee without them knowing. Check your state laws on that one.



Stu

If shes good at selling she will convince them that ordering via telephone is the best and quickest way anyway to get the sale. I know once you have the customer you have gotta get em, when they sayh oh yes and Ill order via the web then you will certainly lose up to 40% of them cos youve given them time to think…and lokk around.



Get her on a commision of telephone sales only and watch your conversions go up.

When did you see alcatell and other major telesales companies get you on the phine and then say OH YES go and order on our website…no no never, get the sale while they are with you there and then let em leave and youve lost em cos they go to Joe nobody and say " the lovely lady over at great shop inc has quoted me this price…oh baby no worries well beat that says the nasty shark"

u get my drift but all this canbe done politely and confidantlely. If she cant do it then shes not worth the commision, simple.

JOhn

[QUOTE]By the way…it’s not a good idea to record an employee without them knowing. Check your state laws on that one.[/QUOTE]



That was a joke to people able to read outside of the box…



If you can’t trust your employee, then ask the customer to add a simple notation in the comments section while placing their order that they spoke to “Betty” earlier on the phone. :wink:



You might also consider adding another “Profile Field” called “Sales Rep” which a customer could enter a sales reps name while placing their order.

Tread Carefully on this one.



I personally will call up a company to get specialised information that isn’t on a website. I’ll get my answer, handup and then order online. Yes I do this frequently.

As a manager I would prefer to do the following for my employees:



Higher Payrate & remove commissions.

You will find that that this will remove employee greed and improve overall productivity for many reasons but primarily:



Priority is no longer:

Fighting over customers

Fighting over phonecalls.

Attract a ill-informed customer

Customer whom has been rushed into purchasing



Just saying - If you trust them, great - If you don’t fix this up before it starts producing lemons/sour notes

[quote name=‘Struck’]You should immediately start recording all of her phone conversations…[/QUOTE]



Hadn’t thought of that one, will get right on it! LOL

[quote name=‘derbytown502’]

Give her an assigned three digit code or something similar that she will give the customer to put in before checking out. This way you know that she had something to do with the sale. I’m fairly certain that you can accomplish this with CS’s promotions.

[/QUOTE]



I’d thought of that, but she has the ability to edit orders in the back end for address changes and the like, so she could update an order with that code without me knowing. All the logs says is that the order was updated but not what was updated.



I may sound like I am paranoid and that she is a bad employee that I can’t trust, I don’t think either are the case, but I just want to make sure things are fair. Someone once told me “Owning a small business is the best thing in the world… Until you hire an employee.” :slight_smile:



Thanks for the input

[quote name=‘ChrisW’]I’d thought of that, but she has the ability to edit orders in the back end for address changes and the like, so she could update an order with that code without me knowing. All the logs says is that the order was updated but not what was updated.[/quote]

The sales rep field is probably the best way but then again you’ll still have an issue of most customers will ignore this field so a promotional code is probably the best way. If a customer says they will order online versus the phone, then if the sales rep just says “well let me give you this promotional code” then this will not only make the customer more likely to order online versus abandoning the sales rep will get credit, then I’d have to look up to find out what the code to edit would be but you could modify one of the templates to exclude that promotion from being edited so she could not update this promotional field assigned to her - Sno

What about editing the Order notification mail template to include the Notes/Promo Code.



The order creation process will include the code ONLY IF the customer enters it. She cant edit the automated emails generated from the system.



Just an idea…